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HELP Indian Ringneck won't stop biting

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Sally&Bud
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Joined: Mon Apr 11, 2016 9:56 pm

HELP Indian Ringneck won't stop biting

Post by Sally&Bud » Mon Apr 11, 2016 10:02 pm

:( I got an Indian Ringneck a week and a half ago and it won't stop biting.
I've been told that it's only 5 months old and was hand raised but didn't have much time spent with it in the last couple weeks ago
It bites my neck, hands, fingers anything it can get.
I need help

sanjays mummi
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Location: Bedfordshire UK

Re: HELP Indian Ringneck won't stop biting

Post by sanjays mummi » Tue Apr 12, 2016 6:39 am

Goodness!, you wouldn't expect a hand reared bird to bite, would you?, he/she is definitely angst or defensive biting, and you are going to have to keep your anatomy out of beaks way until the little nipper trusts you more. Start by offering a treat through the bars, and see if it's accepted, or used simply to get another bite in, I'm sure more experienced folk on here will maybe be of more help, don't give up on your bird, it Does take time.

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ringneck
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Re: HELP Indian Ringneck won't stop biting

Post by ringneck » Tue Apr 12, 2016 11:26 pm

Hello,

Welcome to our forum!

Now, let's address the topic of biting. Before we get into answering how you can deal with the biting let's look at the world through your bird's eyes first.

In your post you had said the bird had not been handled, so from this I'm going to assume the bird does not know you as of yet and might be uncertain of your intentions. You also said you acquired the bird around a week and a half ago I might add. That being said, I would give the bird time to adjust to you and its surroundings. The bird might be agitated due to the sudden change in its environment and is now being asked to be handled--so give him time ;) . That being said, the bird will more than likely react by biting as it is the only thing to try to communicate its wishes to you.

So, there are two ways you can approach this biting--assuming the bird is biting due to not being well socialized and tamed. The first and highly recommended one would be to adopt a positive reinforcement program. Start by offering the bird treats and gradually persuading the bird to step up onto your hands. This is a lengthy process, but it is well worth the effort. Once the bird is sure of your intentions, and has mastered stepping onto your hand effortlessly, take the bird and start incorporating the bird into your life. What do I mean by this? This simply means that if the bird steps up, then you can handle it while you're doing dishes, watching television, or moving it to its play stand. Over time, the bird will come to associate you as something exciting and will gladly enjoy your company. Hopefully, this time spent with the bird will create a bond.

The other option would be to give the bird a few weeks to settle in then start incorporating the bird into your life without using positive reinforcement. For example, you might want to take the bird into a quiet place and just hold him there. This will help the bird get to know your intentions. Do this daily over and over, and the bird will become tame.

I should note that tame in my book only means the bird is comfortable around humans, nothing more. It does not mean the bird is bonded to you or the bird has mastered any tricks. ;)

Once you have gotten to the point where your ringneck is tame, it is important you ignore all biting. Don't react to it, don't make eye contact, or don't punish the bird. These birds do not understand punishments. If the bird bites, just pull your hand back or distract it.

Once the bird understands that biting is not an effective route of communication, it usually ceases. Your goal should be to continually reward the bird for positive behavior and ignore all unwanted behavior. If you stick to this and be consistent then you'll have a tame ringneck in no time that does not bite.

If you do go the positive reinforcement route, check our member InTheAir as she has tamed an aviary bred ringneck through positive reinforcement. She has done remarkable things with her two birds. I'm sure she'll stop in and get you started.

If you just want to work with the bird by handling it, check out or member mazziesmom as she runs a parrot rescore. Though she is no longer active on the forum, I was able to pull an old article she wrote in the past from the web archive about her bird Mazzie.

https://web.archive.org/web/20050214124 ... zstory.htm

Best of luck and keep us updated!

Best wishes, ;)

IMRAN-C

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ringneck
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Posts: 1385
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Re: HELP Indian Ringneck won't stop biting

Post by ringneck » Tue Apr 12, 2016 11:27 pm

Hello,

Welcome to our forum!

Now, let's address the topic of biting. Before we get into answering how you can deal with the biting let's look at the world through your bird's eyes first.

In your post you had said the bird had not been handled, so from this I'm going to assume the bird does not know you as of yet and might be uncertain of your intentions. You also said you acquired the bird around a week and a half ago I might add. That being said, I would give the bird time to adjust to you and its surroundings. The bird might be agitated due to the sudden change in its environment and is now being asked to be handled--so give him time ;) . That being said, the bird will more than likely react by biting as it is the only thing to try to communicate its wishes to you.

So, there are two ways you can approach this biting--assuming the bird is biting due to not being well socialized and tamed. The first and highly recommended one would be to adopt a positive reinforcement program. Start by offering the bird treats and gradually persuading the bird to step up onto your hands. This is a lengthy process, but it is well worth the effort. Once the bird is sure of your intentions, and has mastered stepping onto your hand effortlessly, take the bird and start incorporating the bird into your life. What do I mean by this? This simply means that if the bird steps up, then you can handle it while you're doing dishes, watching television, or moving it to its play stand. Over time, the bird will come to associate you as something exciting and will gladly enjoy your company. Hopefully, this time spent with the bird will create a bond.

The other option would be to give the bird a few weeks to settle in then start incorporating the bird into your life without using positive reinforcement. For example, you might want to take the bird into a quiet place and just hold him there. This will help the bird get to know your intentions. Do this daily over and over, and the bird will become tame.

I should note that tame in my book only means the bird is comfortable around humans, nothing more. It does not mean the bird is bonded to you or the bird has mastered any tricks. ;)

Once you have gotten to the point where your ringneck is tame, it is important you ignore all biting. Don't react to it, don't make eye contact, or don't punish the bird. These birds do not understand punishments. If the bird bites, just pull your hand back or distract it.

Once the bird understands that biting is not an effective route of communication, it usually ceases. Your goal should be to continually reward the bird for positive behavior and ignore all unwanted behavior. If you stick to this and be consistent then you'll have a tame ringneck in no time that does not bite.

If you do go the positive reinforcement route, check our member InTheAir as she has tamed an aviary bred ringneck through positive reinforcement. She has done remarkable things with her two birds. I'm sure she'll stop in and get you started.

If you just want to work with the bird by handling it, check out or member mazziesmom as she runs a parrot rescore. Though she is no longer active on the forum, I was able to pull an old article she wrote in the past from the web archive about her bird Mazzie.

https://web.archive.org/web/20050214124 ... zstory.htm

Best of luck and keep us updated!

Best wishes, ;)

IMRAN-C

Principe azul
Posts: 2
Joined: Sun May 15, 2016 7:14 am
Location: Costa Rica

Re: HELP Indian Ringneck won't stop biting

Post by Principe azul » Sun May 15, 2016 9:20 am

:-h hi thanks alot for the info. Is really helpful. :ymapplause: :-bd
I would like to ask you about if you think having a tame bird with one is not tame it's okay or should I separate them because they are from the same breed they come from the same mother and father but I bought one with almost a month different from the other and the first one I got is so stick to me and social and then I got the second one and I was trying to tame it and I let the first one to socialize with the second one but I noticed that the first one when is with the second one it goes back to bite and its while Behavior instead of helping the second one to socialize with me do you think I should separate them completely until the second one is tame or should I keep them together? Because I decided to separate them first from the second one I got and it was going back to be not social with me but I don't want to be mean to my second birth plus you know my first bird is so sweet it sleeps with me we have special place for it in my bed and it stays there it has a little blanket and these are kind of things that I don't want to lose because I think the second bird doesn't let me touch it either because he has my bird next to it.[/color]

sanjays mummi
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Joined: Fri Apr 27, 2012 12:07 pm
Location: Bedfordshire UK

Re: HELP Indian Ringneck won't stop biting

Post by sanjays mummi » Sun May 15, 2016 10:54 am

I would separate them for now, because if your tame bird is being bitten, it's just Not fair on him/her. Besides, the biting might develop into something much more serious. There are no guarantees, same species animals are not averse to attacking each other. I seriously doubt your semi feral bird was hand reared,

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