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greetings from nottingham england

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t5copper
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Joined: Mon Dec 30, 2013 6:02 am

greetings from nottingham england

Post by t5copper » Mon Dec 30, 2013 6:16 am

Hello everyone

im new to the forum and new to irn's ....I purchased a couple of these fellows from a breeder only a few days ago ,one lovely green and a lovely olive,(emmy & edmond)sex unknown :?: reported to be 4 months old and its safe to say at the moment there not the cuddliest of fellows :lol: , given time im hoping to hand tame them and build a good relationship, iv joined you on this forum to gain advice and wisdom from more experienced hands so I thank you all in advance for any advice recieved and I look forward to putting it into practice

thanks for reading.james

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Mitchan
Posts: 18
Joined: Sat Jul 27, 2013 3:41 am

Re: greetings from nottingham england

Post by Mitchan » Mon Dec 30, 2013 9:02 am

Welcome, James!
I love green IRNs, and olives are very beautiful! :)

Good luck with taming and getting to know your new babies, I'm sure it'll be an interesting journey.
Oh, and, I love that you got two birds instead of one. In my experience, all of my birds have at least been way happier and helthier when in pairs or flocks, and it's very natural for them, so I think that's great! :mrgreen: (And as a bonus, I get to watch them be cute with eachother and I also get to spend a lot of quality time with EACH, so I always have a bird to hang out with, even when one gets tired of me or something, lol :P)

Anyways, good luck with Emmy and Edmond!

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ringneck
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Re: greetings from nottingham england

Post by ringneck » Mon Dec 30, 2013 6:40 pm

Welcome to our forum.

We have a wonderful set of ringneck owners here. Really, it's so touching to see so many people love their birds as much as we do. You're in for a wonderful treat if you tame your ringnecks. Just remember things might progress a little slower due to the fact you have two birds. Also, be sure to search the forum for taming! We have a lot of great information here.

Best Wishes :wink: ,

IMRAN-C

Little Buttercup
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Re: greetings from nottingham england

Post by Little Buttercup » Mon Dec 30, 2013 9:26 pm

Hi and welcome to the forum. Wishing you all the best in taming your beautiful birds.

Ash

t5copper
Posts: 11
Joined: Mon Dec 30, 2013 6:02 am

Re: greetings from nottingham england

Post by t5copper » Tue Dec 31, 2013 7:44 am

Thanks for the welcome guys

yup cant wait to get training these guys but there having some settling in time rightnow obv, feeling a little overwhelmed I cant deny as there totally terrified of me :( but im hoping they will calm down....

could anyone answer me a question, I see all over the internet that treat bribary is the way Forward with training them?I can understand the logic but rightnow if I go to give them a treat...apple for example, they go wild the minute I get within 2ft of the cage im worried they are going to do themself an injury...if you were me would you leave off getting too close or is perseverance better?

MissK
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Re: greetings from nottingham england

Post by MissK » Tue Dec 31, 2013 12:31 pm

I think you should be spending a good deal of reasonably quiet time in the same room, but not close enough to spook them. Put your computer in there, and anything you spend time sitting around doing (reading, napping, knitting - whatever it is you work on at home). Speak gently to them now and then. Have a chat. Do not stare at them. In this way, they can watch you and see how you act. They can make some decisions about how safe you are to be near.

As that's going on, you should definitely be eating stuff, especially things Ringnecks like to eat. We're talking about sunflower seeds, fruit, esp apple, pear, salad, veggies like carrot, also the healthiest bread you can find, nuts, even clean, organic breakfast cereal, maybe very clean (nothing in it) oatmeal.

Be sure there is a food bowl in the cage placed in the spot you can access with minimum fuss and invasiveness. From time to time, you quietly and gently go over to the cage and drop in a little tiny bit of what you are eating, and retreat immediately. Your goal is not to do anything but get that food in there and go back to what you're doing, continuing to eat. You might even give them a warning, like "here I come" or whatever.

I know that sounds pretty simple, and it's true I don't think it will tame your birds overnight. However, it will establish for them that you are not a threat, that you have good things to eat, and that you will share. Eating communally is a big deal for Ringnecks. Needless to say, while you are at this project (and always) you must refrain from actions that spook the birds. Once you've done this for a while (I'm talking days or weeks, depending on your compliance and success) you will probably notice that the birds are starting to be a little interested to see you approach with food. They may be looking. They may stand their ground when you come near. When they start leaning and taking a step toward the bowl as you are there, you can rejoice and tell all your friends (that's us).
-MissK

zentoucan
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Re: greetings from nottingham england

Post by zentoucan » Wed Jan 01, 2014 5:10 pm

T5copper
The Idea is to have your IRNs come to trust you and that is achieved by having trust and bond building sessions. I recently adopted a aviary bred IRN (Bluey) who had very limited human contact (food and water changes only) and in less than a month I have Bluey stepping up onto my finger. taking food from my hand and recently while training Delfin (my Alexandrine) Bluey flew to my hand and took a sunflower seed and flew back to the top of the cage. Bluey is now doing this daily.

By using this method you are showing the IRN you want to be their friend and have no intention to harm and food is a great motivator. Do not stick your hand into their cage. This is an invasion of their territory, big no no. after all how would you feel if someone just walked into your house or room un-invited. Also watch the eyes, if the eyes are pinned then I would not put my hand near the IRN as the bird could be over excited or aggressive either way you will most likely be bitten.

Anyway, first you need to find out what your IRNs favorite food is. I suggest that you put around five different foods on a plate.
these can be a couple of sun flower seeds, pumpkin seeds, corn kernels, pine seeds and a couple balls of millet. watching, see which one the IRN eats first. this will be their favorite food. now that you know, you use this food as a training treat and you use it only for training.

I gather the IRNs are caged inside the house and probably in the living room. This is the method I used on my aviary bred IRN with great results. You will need a clicker. Once you have accomplish this method you will need to continue interacting daily with your bird.

Day one: When the IRN is in the cage, enter the room and go to the furthest point from the cage with the clicker in your hand. Approach the cage until the IRN shows signs of being alert and/or frighten. Stop and just stand there and wait until the IRN relaxes. Then click the clicker once and take two to three steps back. Wait two to three minutes, then approach the cage again until the IRN shows signs of being alert and/or frighten. But make sure you get a little closer. Stop and just stand there until the IRN relaxes then click the clicker once and take two to three steps back. Repeat this method until you are standing next to the cage. This can take about 15 minutes to do. Then walk away. Wait for around 20 to 30 minutes and repeat this method until you can walk up to the cage without the IRN being scared. This could take 7 to 9 times. Once you have done this. With the clicker sit next to the cage and eat some food and have a spray of millet with you. When the IRN shows interest and approaches you offer the millet and wait. When the IRN takes some of the millet click the clicker once.
Once the IRN gets use to taking the millet replace it with training treat. Feed the IRN through the cage. This can be done in one day. Remember to click the clicker once every time the IRN take the training treat.

Day two: start by feeding the IRN through cage. Do this for 10 to 15 minutes then wait 20 to 30 minutes. Open the cage door and offer training treats at the cage entrance. Be patient and remember to click the clicker once every time the IRN take food. Do this for at least 7 to 8 times that day with 20 to 30 minutes breaks between.

Day three: open the cage door and get the IRN to the entrance with training treats and remember to click the clicker once every time the IRN take food. Now instead of using training treats you go back to the spray of millet. With the clicker and millet in the same hand and with your other hand make it into a pistol. Focus the IRN attention onto the millet and then bring the pistol hand up very slowly to the feet of the IRN. Your finger must be parallel to the perch and level with the IRN's feet. Do not touch the IRN. Don't remove your pistol hand from this position. Now move the millet so it out of reach of the IRN. The IRN will have to step forward to get to the millet. Therefore stepping up onto finger. at first don't expect the IRN to step up onto and/or stay on your finger at first and there is a possibility you could get bitten then again you might not. Do this for 10 to 15 minutes then wait 20 to 30 minutes and repeat this method again at least 7 to 8 times that day. You will need to continue doing this daily to reinforce the behaviour of stepping up.
Of course there is the possibility that you might not achieve the results for each day session just continue that part of this method the next day. I achieved results in three days with Bluey but I spent a lot of time with Bluey to achieve the results.

Remember not to force the IRN. The idea is to train the IRN to do what you want without force. Every interaction you have with your IRN is a trust and bond building session and always finish any interaction on a positive.
TIP if the IRN doesn't take the training treat within 15 to 20 seconds. don't click the clicker and remove the treat from the IRN's sight for 5 to 10 seconds, then re-offer the IRN the training treat. IRN are quite greedy when it comes to food. So by removing the training treat, it triggers this greed and when you re-offer the training treat it will mostly likely be taken.

if your IRN bites, do not yell, scream, cry, jump around or put on a show. The IRNs will see it as a great show and will be encouraged and reinforced to continue biting. the best thing to do is ignore it on matter how much it hurts. leaving the room will work. showing your displeasure on your face and saying no in a tone of voice that also conveys your Displeasure.

of course it's up to you how you train your IRN's but over the years I have used many methods some good, some bad. but found this method achieves excellent results in a short time. but like anything worth achieving, you need to apply time.

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ringneck
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Re: greetings from nottingham england

Post by ringneck » Fri Jan 03, 2014 9:00 pm

zentoucan wonderful post ! 8)

You have got this down to an art. :wink:

zentoucan
Posts: 150
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Re: greetings from nottingham england

Post by zentoucan » Sat Jan 04, 2014 1:02 am

it worked for me and my IRN Bluey so I believe in sharing the goodness

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