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hi from uk

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rayhan
Posts: 31
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2013 11:05 am

hi from uk

Post by rayhan » Sat Sep 14, 2013 2:35 pm

hi im ray, from uk. i got ringnecks for about 7 months and there about 10 moths old so yeah im still new to this, if anyone can, can they please let me know of some important information i need to know about my birds eg certain foods that are harmfull etc

thanks

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InTheAir
Posts: 2040
Joined: Sat Jan 12, 2013 4:24 pm

Re: hi from uk

Post by InTheAir » Sat Sep 14, 2013 3:01 pm

Hi Ray,

Welcome to the forum.
I highly recommend browsing the sticky posts in the different setions of this forum. There is a good one on what you can feed a parrot in the diet and housing section, it is very comprehensive.

One of our members recently wrote a very helpful guide to using the search function on this forum viewtopic.php?f=2&t=17649

Regards,
Claire

rayhan
Posts: 31
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2013 11:05 am

Re: hi from uk

Post by rayhan » Sun Sep 15, 2013 1:19 am

thanks claire i will definitely read it, could i just ask if you are experienced in this and if you are a breeder if you dont mind me asking, i want to breed my birds because the previous owner did not look after them properly and i have a slight hunch they have been abused i can tell by some behaviour. i had budgies and cocktails, the budgies were tame but cocktial not so much but i got them used to me and so on but the male irn will panic and fly around the cage when im just next to the cage not sure why

thanks

rayhan

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InTheAir
Posts: 2040
Joined: Sat Jan 12, 2013 4:24 pm

Re: hi from uk

Post by InTheAir » Sun Sep 15, 2013 2:18 am

Ray, I don't breed birds. I am not particularly experienced with them either, my boyfriend and I have one at present and are getting another in a few weeks, when ever it is fledged and feeding independently from its parents.
I have put in a lot of research to training and interacting with shy birds. I recommend you do the same, starting with this link; http://learningparrots.com/blog/trainin ... l-parrots/
You aquiring a broad understanding of the the topic is the best way to move forward with your bird.

Regards,
Claire

rayhan
Posts: 31
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2013 11:05 am

Re: hi from uk

Post by rayhan » Sun Sep 15, 2013 3:23 am

thanks, i will look into it, my female is confident but when i come close the male starts going crazy which makes the female scared, and i tried separating them but i can see they get stressed out they try breaking the cages to get back to one another even if they are in separate rooms

MissK
Posts: 3006
Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2012 3:46 pm
Location: Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.

Re: hi from uk

Post by MissK » Sun Sep 15, 2013 4:28 am

Welcome.
i want to breed my birds because the previous owner did not look after them properly and i have a slight hunch they have been abused i can tell by some behaviour.
I'm afraid I don't understand the logic here.
-MissK

rayhan
Posts: 31
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2013 11:05 am

Re: hi from uk

Post by rayhan » Sun Sep 15, 2013 4:33 am

yeah haha it dont make sense, i wanted a pet bird but these birds have been abused so they wont ever trust me, so i want them to breed so i can train the babys

Little Buttercup
Posts: 344
Joined: Wed Sep 05, 2012 12:03 am

Re: hi from uk

Post by Little Buttercup » Sun Sep 15, 2013 4:51 am

Welcome rayhan

Ash

MissK
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Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2012 3:46 pm
Location: Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.

Re: hi from uk

Post by MissK » Sun Sep 15, 2013 5:22 am

With respect, although cautious, the Indian Ringneck is highly intelligent. There is yet plenty of time for your birds to learn to accept you, although they may never be cuddly. The IRN is not known for cuddliness anyway! Your birds are not even a year old.

While I am not a breeder, it is my overall impression they are too young for raising babies still. As well, it seems that once IRNs breed, they are likely to want to continue doing that. Some of our members are experiencing great challenge with their hormonal females at the moment. If it were me, I would seek not to encourage the female to thoughts of breeding. As well, the IRN is not a domesticated animal. Hand raising the babies will not guarantee they become tame and snuggly adults. There is more and ongoing work to be done. I am concerned that in breeding your birds you may be unpleasantly surprised to just have a larger number of untame birds.

I understand the frustration of the pet bird's lack of tameness. I also know it takes far longer to reach an agreement with them than we would prefer. Having helped a ten year old bird rehabilitate himself from lack of sufficient tameness and other situations, I know it takes a long time and a special approach. I would urge you, however, to take advantage of the resource of this forum to work on taming your birds you already have. I know you have already tried, but now you have this resource that you did not have before. It may go better with help.

My own bird, a decade old already when I got him, has gone from fleeing my approach to willingly flying to my hand. I have written rather a lot here in hopes of helping others tame their birds. If you search, I am sure you will find some of my posts. I and others here are willing to review your efforts so far, and assist with taming suggestions in any way we can.

I would personally be very sorry for you to just close the book on trying to tame the birds you have. Unless you are willing to house and protect them, as well as responsibly handle any babies, for the next 20 or 30 years, I would really hope you will not breed them. It may also be possible to find a home for them with someone who is more prepared to do the work of taming. It is far easier to purchase a tame bird than to grow your own.
-MissK

rayhan
Posts: 31
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2013 11:05 am

Re: hi from uk

Post by rayhan » Sun Sep 15, 2013 5:30 am

no way will i give them away there mine, even if there never tame ill still give them a big avairy to fly around in, and ill give them a nesting box if they want to breed because i dont want to stop there natrual doings, but im still going to try to tame them i heard that one untame bird is easy to tame but two is hard as they tend to ignore you because they have another irn in the cage

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Dixie-1
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Location: St. David Az.

Re: hi from uk

Post by Dixie-1 » Sun Sep 15, 2013 1:17 pm

Hi and good luck with your new IRN,s Ray. Guess if I were to give advice I would say don't rush it, they are young . :D
Just takin a break !

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rayhan
Posts: 31
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2013 11:05 am

Re: hi from uk

Post by rayhan » Sun Sep 15, 2013 1:35 pm

i wont rush anything as i cant force them to do anything lol but if i could i wouldnt anyway thats abuse but thanks, im just looking for exprienced irn breeders so i can ask questions and get quick response

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InTheAir
Posts: 2040
Joined: Sat Jan 12, 2013 4:24 pm

Re: hi from uk

Post by InTheAir » Sun Sep 15, 2013 4:07 pm

If you just want a pet bird, have you considered buying one from a breeder? Then you can pick any colour you like.
Hand raising the bird yourself won't make it any tamer than if someone else raises it. We got our bird at 3 months old and he is perfectly comfortable with us, extremely tame and exceptional at learning tricks. He prefers my boyfriend and myself to anyone else.

There's no reason why your current birds shouldn't tame down anyway. Missk has written so much good advice here and there are heaps of good articles on websites like behavior works and good bird inc. Even tame, hand raised birds can develop behaviour problems, you can read about heaps on here.

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Skyes_crew
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Location: Hawaii

Re: hi from uk

Post by Skyes_crew » Mon Sep 16, 2013 2:21 am

Breeding IRN's should not even be a thought right now. You should learn everything there is to know about birds first. Animal husbandry. Anatomy. Caring for sick birds. Caring for baby birds. You have to be prepared for anything and confident that you can help in any situation. Breeding birds is not sticking two birds in an aviary with a box and seeing what happens. Next you should learn about the breeding habits of ringnecks specifically. The birds should be seen by a vet and tested for disease prior to breeding. You should learn how to properly feed your ringnecks. Learn what diet requirements they have during breeding season and off season. Learn proper cage and breeding box size. Proper nesting material. Learn what to have on hand in case you have to hand feed...syringes, formula, crop needles, brooder. Have a gram scale handy to keep track of the babies weight. Contact a local breeder and ask questions and see if you can shadow him/her for a couple of days to learn from.

Your birds are way too young to be breeding. They are still babies. By their second season they are usually ready to start breeding. But please do your homework before undertaking a project where you hold life or death in your hands.
I am owned by my birds...and I wouldn't have it any other way :D

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rayhan
Posts: 31
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2013 11:05 am

Re: hi from uk

Post by rayhan » Mon Sep 16, 2013 8:14 am

yeah we got these from a breeder and the breeder gave them to her niece, and the way thins looked with the bird eg feather conditions and so on it looked like the birds were abused, i have done research but sounds like i need to do more, anyone out there who could help if i cant find any info

MissK
Posts: 3006
Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2012 3:46 pm
Location: Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.

Re: hi from uk

Post by MissK » Mon Sep 16, 2013 9:49 am

Hi Ray,

Claire has given you two good links. You will be able to use them to find information.

Here are a few names of people you can Google, to find the information they are providing. They are considered experts:

Mattie Sue Athen
Pamela Clark
Robin Deutsch
Barbara Heidenrich

BirdTricks.com also looks very good, though I have no personal experience with them.

I believe you will have difficulty finding someone to answer your questions unless you are able to pose a specific, clearly worded question. If you need an in-depth tutorial on parrot-keeping, you will really have to follow some of the research tips we have just given you. If you are not willing to follow good advice and do a little work to just read, how will you expect to do the actual hands-on work of raising and training living creatures? I'm sure everyone here would like to help you learn to help yourself, but you will have to do your part by following through on the advice and references.

I have reviewed your posts in this thread, and I think these are the questions you have asked:
please let me know of some important information i need to know about my birds eg certain foods that are harmfull etc
The first part of your request, for "important information" is overly general and beyond the scope of simple forum posts. Regarding foods, if you do not want to use the search function, as InTheAir recommended, to research diet for IRNs, you may simply go to the DIET AND HOUSING section and read the extensive sticky note Melika has kindly posted.
could i just ask if you are experienced in this and if you are a breeder
This question regarding InTheAir personally has been answered.
im just looking for exprienced irn breeders so i can ask questions and get quick response
You may have better luck finding breeders in the IRN BREEDERS section. However, as noted, you will need to ask clear and specific questions in order for them to be able to help you.
i have done research but sounds like i need to do more, anyone out there who could help if i cant find any info
InTheAir, Dixie-1, Skyes_Crew, and I have tried to help you. Please guide us by asking clear questions, such as those using the interrogatives "How", What", "Why", When", and "Where". An example of this might be "How should I give fresh foods to my bird?" An answer to that question might be "Give your birds fresh foods that have been washed and do not contain any toxic bits, such as the seeds of apples and the area immediately around those seeds. Some birds do well with a mix of fresh foods that have been cut into small bits, or even minced together. You may put these in a bowl or on a plate in the cage, or at the playstand if you use one. Large pieces may also be offered. It is particularly beneficial to present the food inside something else, such as a foraging ball, so the bird has the benefit of working for its food. Regardless of how fresh food is presented, it should be taken away after a few hours to minimize the risk of the bird eating spoiled food. New fresh food may then be presented, or you can wait until the next meal time. Carefully wash food containers before each use."

Please try this format of asking questions, and post your questions in the sections of the forum that are related to the particular topic that interests you. I think you will enjoy much improved success in seeking answers.
-MissK

rayhan
Posts: 31
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2013 11:05 am

Re: hi from uk

Post by rayhan » Mon Sep 16, 2013 11:22 am

thanks miss k, i have read you post cleary and understand what you are saying, i will look into those experts and those sites. as of now i have no main worry, except food.


i always change the parot mix every morning, but i have not really gave them any plant based food except 2 slices of apples every 2 days, what is the diet plan of your birds. today i gave them small bits of broccoli, coliflower and chopped carrots they seemed to have like those so how many times do i give them this food

also should i give them vegetables oneday parrot mix the next and fruits the next. whats your opinion


thanks every one for your help this community seems like a family so please think of me as a child and teach me what is necessary, lool sounds *** but its true

Thanks

ray

MissK
Posts: 3006
Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2012 3:46 pm
Location: Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.

Re: hi from uk

Post by MissK » Mon Sep 16, 2013 2:05 pm

Ray, I would suggest you search for the posts of jmlw7. She has done a most impressive job of researching and feeding her bird.

For myself, I offer
*ABBA seed Cockatiel mix without sunflower 100% of the time.
*a mix of Bob's Red Mill 10 grain breakfast cereal and Higgins In Tune pellets and RoudyBush Natural pellets. I pulverized the pellets and servie it with some water to make a mush and give it once or twice a week.
*Kale, Collards, or Brussels Spruots every day without fail.
*various fruits and vegetables that catch my eye as I go through the market. I offer at least 3 kinds every day, and usually different from the day before. A mix of colours is best for nutrition.
*sunflower or safflower seeds, or bits of nuts, as treat by hand or incentive for training
* small, lean bits of meat, very small amount, several times a week - fish, pork, or egg
*tiny scraps of whatever I am eating, once in a while, unless it's something I already mentioned
*tiny bit of all-natural dog biscuit if the dogs are having one in front of him. Note, this is not for feeding but for flock bonding.

I've probably forgotten something, but that is what springs to mind. Rocky was to the vet for bloodwork in the Spring and was overall in excellent shape.

I strongly suggest that you give your birds dark green leafy vegetables every day. They should also have fresh fruits and vegetables in a range of colours. It is not necessary to give every thing at once. It would be OK, for instance, to give a fruit and a vegetable (plus green leaves) every day, but change the fruit and vegetable type from day to day. I personally feel there is a benefit to feeding the bird seeds, but seeds cannot be the only food. Pellets are an option, but many feel (as I do) that they are not the best solution by themselves either. There was a big discussion on pellets here. Likewise, there is a smaller discussion on meat. You can search for them.
-MissK

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