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Can IRN's be re-homed if they're attached?

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nonoti
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu May 01, 2014 11:30 pm

Can IRN's be re-homed if they're attached?

Post by nonoti » Thu May 01, 2014 11:37 pm

Hi All,

I'm looking for someone who has experience or knows this topic well, since i'm not so happy about having to ask.

I've had an IRN for 4 years. He's tame, he's friendly and really loves everyone in the family. Unfortunately though a lot has changed with regards to me working from home, and the fact that we live in a complex with neighbours right next to us. Lately he has become completely attached to us to the extend that every second spent in the cage (apart from sleeping) is screaming.

I know birds like to be vocal in the mornings, which he is. But unless he's out the cage with one of us he doesn't stop. I've tried covering him, spraying him with a water gun etc but the fact is he's not learning - and perhaps its not his fault. He was brought up to have free reign but now just can't due to changes at home.

This has also resulted in people complaining about the noise, let alone the fact that i'm slowly but surely losing my mind and just do not have the time anymore give him 24x7 obedience training. I also think he's frustrated at being caged a lot too.

So my question is, if I had to find him a new loving home - would he adjust? Would he be able to carry on living or does it generally mean a death sentence to let a bird like this who's been with us for so long go?

Thanks,

nonoti

MissK
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Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2012 3:46 pm
Location: Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.

Re: Can IRN's be re-homed if they're attached?

Post by MissK » Fri May 02, 2014 1:10 am

Hi. I think your question ought to be "Can he learn to live in a cage peacefully again?" It does sound as though he has become accustomed to living as much out of the cage as he wants, but now your lifestyle change requires that he begin living caged. Is that right? It further sounds as though it is being caged that prompts him to excessive vocalization. Is that right? Is it possible that is is not separation from you but confinement in the cage which is his primary cause for complaint?
He was brought up to have free reign but now just can't due to changes at home.
Lately he has become completely attached to us to the extend that every second spent in the cage (apart from sleeping) is screaming.....But unless he's out the cage with one of us he doesn't stop.
I am going to, without having been at your house, suggest that it is the increased caging causing the noise. From the bird's point of view, that is totally reasonable. I think, in your heart, you know this.

Your bird will adjust to a new family, have no fear. The real problem is that when the new family tries to keep him in a cage, he will object to the cage in their home as he does in yours. If he makes as much noise there, how long do you imagine they will keep him before deciding the noise is too much? If they do stick it out and keep him, without releasing him from the cage, is it hard to imagine he will seek additional outlets for his objections, such as plucking or other self-mutilation? I'm not saying that will definitely happen - I have no crystal ball. But if I were placing money on it, that's how I would bet. It is not a sentence of death he faces, but a sentence of life.

I believe what you need to do is return him to his previous level of freedom and then retrain him to accept the cage. You can seek professional help for that, or you can just do it yourself. The concept you want to investigate is "desensitization" or "acclimatization". Water spraying and covering are punishment techniques that are not making sense to him and will not be effective. Once he is more accepting of the cage, you can then decide if you want to keep him or rehome him. I believe it is your responsibility, though, to help him out of this problem so that he can enjoy a new life in a new family instead of being shuffled from place to place when nobody will keep him due to the noise.

It would also be an excellent idea to advertise him for rehoming right here, with full disclosure, in case there is a compassionate, experienced, and knowledgeable IRN keeper who is willing to take on the burden of retraining him.
-MissK

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InTheAir
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Re: Can IRN's be re-homed if they're attached?

Post by InTheAir » Fri May 02, 2014 1:53 am

Hey there,
Missk has said it well. You have trained the bird to behave in certain ways, you can train him to behave differently or find him an appropriate home that can work with him, but be honest with the new home or you are probably condemning him to a horrible life.

In the interim, give him lots to do by getting him to forage for his food. Search the forum for "foraging".

nonoti
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu May 01, 2014 11:30 pm

Re: Can IRN's be re-homed if they're attached?

Post by nonoti » Fri May 02, 2014 7:21 am

lol foraging :)

I'm smiling cause his idea of getting food is going to the food bowl and screaming until you put something in. Then continue screaming till its whichever of the things he actually wanted :) Or if he's out walking to the kitchen cupboard and screaming at it...

On the other side at night he sits with me and cuddles up to my neck and sleeps and kisses and talks. He doesn't seem to be an undisciplined bird, just an irritated one. Which is strange cause i've given him everything he wants.

clawnz
Posts: 147
Joined: Sun Dec 23, 2012 9:59 pm
Location: Auckland NZ

Re: Can IRN's be re-homed if they're attached?

Post by clawnz » Fri May 02, 2014 1:15 pm

Interesting how he has learned to scream until you give in to his wants.
Is there any chance you have spoiled him in the time you have had him?
And so he has ended up giving you grief until you yield.
It will take a lot of effort on your part to retrain him. And a change in the way you respond.
A new owner maybe able to retrain a little easier, as his situation will have changes that he will need to adjust to.
I am not saying rehome him. Just my opinions.

This maybe a good question to ask Barbara Heidenreich on Goodbird. I am sure we have dealt with this sort of thing at her workshops. But for the life of me I cannot remember how to proceed and do not want to put you wrong.

SkyeBerry
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Joined: Fri Mar 21, 2014 2:14 am
Location: Vancouver, BC Canada

Re: Can IRN's be re-homed if they're attached?

Post by SkyeBerry » Fri May 02, 2014 8:49 pm

I agree with MissK about the water spraying and covering as being punishments. And in this case, the exact opposite of what you need to do. You want him to be happy and calm and not scream in his cage yet when he is in the cage more bad things are happening. Not only is he separated and lonely - there is blackness & water sprays. I realize it is for screaming but is the bird making this connection. He does not seem to be. When you put him in the cage good things need to be in it. Does he have a favourite perch outside of the cage? If possible, put it in the cage? Does he have a favourite toy? Put it in the cage. Do not let him have access to these things outside of the cage. Only feed him in the cage. It will give him something to do. Have you taught him what foraging is? People assume birds know. But the reality is wild birds learn this from watching their parents and other birds. If this bird was raised in a house maybe the only place he thinks food is, is in the dish and/or cupboard. You need to get supplies together and let him watch you make the foraging toys. Foraging toys can also have foot toys in them, not just food. Once you make the toys, show your bird how to take them apart. And you need to play with the toy. While unwrapping and playing you need to make all sorts of happy noises and be really excited even though we know you aren't - but you need to convince the bird. When he does anything with the foraging toy, tell him he is such a good boy. Does he like to chew or destroy toys? Does he have items in the cage to chew and destroy? Have you left a radio on? Can you put a tv on a timer? My vet has had clients put together little videos of themselves talking to their birds. She sets an I-pad by the cage and staff occasionally play it for them throughout the day. The vet says this often works wonders. Can you take the bird to work? How big is the cage? Is it too small? Do you realize that if your bird screams while you are not in the room and then you return to the room when he screams, that in that instant you have rewarded the bird? You are actually teaching him that screaming does work.
at night he sits with me and cuddles up to my neck and sleeps and kisses and talks. He doesn't seem to be an undisciplined bird, just an irritated one. Which is strange cause i've given him everything he wants.
He is a very irritated bird - it is because you gave him everything he wanted and then you took yourself and his freedom away.
He was brought up to have free reign but now just can't due to changes at home.
Put yourself in his place, he has done nothing wrong. He has no explanation he can understand. He has no insight into why things changed. But they have. You and your family are his flock - his comfort and safety for 4 years.

There are a lot of things to consider here. If you supply your city/state/country maybe we can help you find someone to work with you. Have you contacted a local bird rescue center? Not to hand over the bird, but ask how to deal with this situation. I would hope that a good facility would be willing to help you so that your bird can stay in a home where he has been looked after well.

And I agree with InTheAir:
be honest with the new home [rescue] or you are probably condemning him to a horrible life.

In my experience it is the loud birds or birds with irritating vocalizations and/or biting problems that get rehomed repeatedly. Do some research, ask more questions, see what resources you have around you. Can the bird go to another family member/friend's house during the day. Perhaps talk to your neighbours and let them know everything you are now doing to fix the problem a change in circumstances created. Perhaps knowing the effort you are putting into various solutions will buy a little more time and patience from your neighbours. Good Luck!

Barbara Heidenreich http://www.goodbirdinc.com/parrot-behav ... ems.html#4 " My parrot screams for attention. How do I stop my parrot from screaming?

Also note on the bottom of the page - #10 Get Additional Free Resources on Parrot Training - Just fill out the form below - that is your first name & email address & there are four boxes to check.

Can also search Barbara's site as well as youtube for many of her free video clips.
Mary

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