What to Feed Your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too!)

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Wessel Gordon
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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too

Postby Wessel Gordon » Sat Aug 30, 2014 2:44 am

Thanks, Donovan.

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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too

Postby ArletaT » Tue Sep 09, 2014 11:09 am

Do you guys know if chia seeds are safe?
Arleta

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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too

Postby Melika » Sat Sep 13, 2014 12:53 pm

ArletaT wrote:Do you guys know if chia seeds are safe?



Yup! Soaked and/or sprouted.

I'm sure they are fine dry, but Hane doesn't like small seeds unless they are at least soaked overnight so that they swell up. Soaked seed is also higher in nutrients, even if not sprouted yet, so it's a win-win.
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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too

Postby Wessel Gordon » Sat Sep 13, 2014 1:15 pm

Does soaked and sprouted sunflower seeds have more nutrients too?

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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too

Postby Melika » Sat Sep 13, 2014 1:40 pm

Wessel Gordon wrote:Does soaked and sprouted sunflower seeds have more nutrients too?

Wessel


All soaked or sprouted seed will have more nutrients than a dry seed. Sprouted will have more than soaked. But soaked is a step up from dry seed. Lately all seed given to Hane (and even the chickens) is at least soaked. http://www.landofvos.com/articles/sprouts.html

I use this to sprout. I just find it easier than using colanders and it fits in my fridge better when I'm ready for the sprouts to slow growth. It also doesn't hold too much to finish off in a week (it's easy to sprout too much). http://sproutpeople.org/easy-sprout-sprouter/
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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too

Postby Donovan » Sat Sep 27, 2014 7:01 pm

HERBS AND SPICES

Which spices are safe?
Which spices are not?

I ask because we all know birds like to eat what you're eating.


This is a copy/paste from another site. It doesn't exactly mirror what's found in my own cabinets but there are a few here at least:


Alfalfa Leaf helps assimilate protein, calcium and other nutrients. Contains chlorophyll. Richest land source of trace minerals. Very rich supply of Beta Carotene, Vitamins K and D. High in Calcium and contains Phosphorus, Iron, Potassium and eight essential enzymes. It is also high in fructo-oligosaccarides which fertilize healthy bacteria in the gut and neutralize bad bacteria overgrowth such as Candida.
Parsley is used as a preventive herb. High in Vitamin B and Potassium. It is said to contain a substance in which cancer cells cannot multiply. Rich in iron, chlorophyll and Vitamins A and C. Contains sodium, copper, thiamin and riboflavin, silicon, sulfur, calcium and cobalt.
Flaxseed supplies the body with essential fatty acids. Not only are flaxseeds richer in these fatty acids than fish oil, but they also taste much better. Flaxseed also promotes strong nails, bones and healthy skin.
Bee Pollen contains 35% Protein, 55% Carbohydrate, 2% Fatty Acids, 3% Minerals and Vitamins. High in B-Complex Vitamins A, C, D and E. Also contains Lecithin, Beta Carotene and Selenium. It is rich in vitamins and contains almost all known minerals, trace elements, enzymes and amino acids. It contains the essence of every plant from which bees collect pollen in combination with digestive enzymes from the bees. This combination of elements make bee pollen an excellent source of antioxidants. Bee pollen is rapidly absorbed into the blood stream and stimulates immunological responses.
Chickweed contains Vitamins A, C and some B, Flavonoids, Calcium, Phosphorus, Potassium and Zinc. It is used for skin problems, to treat blood disorders, gout and arthritis.
Dandelion Leaf benefits liver function. Contains nutritive salts, protein, and is a rich source of Vitamin A. Also high in Vitamins B, C and E. Rich in Potassium, Calcium and sodium. Contains some Phosphorus and Iron as well as Nickel, Cobalt, Tin and Copper.
Red Clover Blossoms and Leaf contain Vitamins A, C, B-Complex, calcium, Chromium, Iron and Magnesium. Ed Clover has also been used effectively as a blood purifier and antibiotic.
Red Raspberry Leaf contains Vitamins A, C, D, E, and B. It is very high in available Calcium.
Rose Hips is abundant in Vitamin C and helps combat stress.
Milk Thistle Seeds supports the liver's ability to maintain normal liver function. Milk thistle works due to its ability to inhibit the factors responsible for liver damage, coupled with the fact it stimulates production of new liver cells to replace old damaged ones. Milk thistle is also an antioxidant that is more potent than Vitamins C and E.
Barley Grass is rich in Beta Carotene, B Vitamins and Vitamin C, the minerals Potassium, Calcium, Iron, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Chlorophyll, 8 essential amino acids and enzymes, including antioxidant and superoxide dismutase. In total, it contains 92 minerals and 22 vitamins.
Dill Weed is high in Calcium and soothing to digestion.
Dulse is rich in Protein. It contains 22% more than chickpeas, almonds or whole sesame seeds. Very high in Vitamins B6 and B12. Relatively low in sodium and high in Potassium. Rich in trace minerals.
Garlic Powder fights bacteria like an antibiotic. Garlic's sulfur compounds, in addition to Selenium and Vitamins A and C containing compounds, make it a potent antioxidant, protecting cell membranes and DNA from damage and disease. Garlic directly attacks bacteria and viruses and stimulates the bodies natural defenses against foreign invaders.
Ginger Powder is an absolute favorite taste of parrots. It is an excellent herb for the respiratory system as well as an effective cleansing agent for the digestive system. It contains Protein, Vitamins A, C and B Complex, Calcium, Phosphorus, Iron, Sodium, Potassium and Magnesium.
Wheat grass contains to many nutrients to mention them all. It is especially high in Fiber, Protein, Chlorophyll, Beta-Carotene, Vitamin B Complex, C, E and K, most minerals and contains 18 Amino Acids. High in Fructo-Oligosaccharides.
Astragalus Powder is an immunomodulator. It contains Glycosides, Polysaccharides, Choline, Betaine, Rumatakenin, and Beta-Sitosterol. It activates the immune system, thus enhancing the body's natural ability to fight disease and protecting the body against a number of toxins.
Chili Flakes is a digestive aid. This flake acts as an anti-inflammatory agent and aids in controlling pain.
Cinnamon is a favorite taste of parrots. It is a digestive aid and recent studies have shown it may help to eliminate E. Coli in food.
Turmeric Root has five times more antioxidant power than Vitamin E. Contains curcumin and many other phytochemicals. Makes foods more digestible and possesses anti-fungal and antibacterial properties and protects the liver by detoxification and scavenging free radicals. It also breaks down fats.
Cayenne Pepper:
Cayenne is rich in the vitamins A, C, iron, potassium and calcium. It also contains some B complex, magnesium, phosphorus and sulfur. It has an antioxident effect that in very high doses can increase the risk of some cancers but in moderate doses can help to heal other cancers.

I want to say one thing about this list of herbs and spices. This comes from a single source on the internet. If you want to give your bird(s) any of these things then do a little more research and don't just accept a single source of information coming from the internet.

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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too

Postby AussieRNOwner » Tue Dec 16, 2014 2:18 am

Thank you very much for this thread. Just brilliant!

I'm picking up my new baby in a couple of days and it's just finished weaning & seems to have a diet of mostly seeds. I'll have to double check if it's been given any fruit or veg. I've been told it's about 14 weeks old.

If it hasn't however, is it best to introduce fresh produce say one or two pieces at a time, or would something like the recipe posted in the first post be good to do?

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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too

Postby SkyeBerry » Wed Dec 17, 2014 5:06 am

AJPeter wrote:Mary what you were saying last month about taste, I offered Billie some mango she put out her tongue and tasted it and then walked away, she did the same thing for water melon, taste is a big thing for her.


I have read that you should never feed food to parrots straight from the fridge, that it should be warmed to average room temperature first. Possibly, it affects their body temperature which I have read is about 104 F depending on species etc. Some foods feel cooler - often higher water content ie) melons. I wonder if Billie would like melon if you microwaved it a few second just so it does not feel cold/cool?
Mary

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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too

Postby AJPeter » Wed Dec 17, 2014 11:51 am

Interesting idea Mary l will try that but Billie is intent on hatching 4 dummy eggs although she does like porridge cooked in the M/w and sprinkled with Grape Nuts.

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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too

Postby Trinnity » Sun Jan 25, 2015 8:30 am

I read they shouldn't have cabbage (and onion and avocado). I won't take a chance on anything I've read isn't good for them.

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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too

Postby Trinnity » Sun Jan 25, 2015 8:35 am

I'd like to share this, which I found doing research:

While Indian Ring Neck Parrots enjoy a great variety of foods and treats, some foods are harmful or even poisonous to them. Among fruits and vegetables, avoid giving your parrot avocado, raw cabbage and onions, eggplant, persimmons, apple seeds, mushrooms, any green parts of tomatoes or potatoes and rhubarb leaves. They may have difficulty digesting milk products, so avoid those. And never give your parrot alcoholic beverages, chocolate and anything containing caffeine.

http://pets.thenest.com/treats-indian-r ... 10321.html

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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too

Postby Melika » Mon Feb 02, 2015 8:41 pm

AussieRNOwner wrote:Thank you very much for this thread. Just brilliant!

I'm picking up my new baby in a couple of days and it's just finished weaning & seems to have a diet of mostly seeds. I'll have to double check if it's been given any fruit or veg. I've been told it's about 14 weeks old.

If it hasn't however, is it best to introduce fresh produce say one or two pieces at a time, or would something like the recipe posted in the first post be good to do?


I like "abundance weaning", which is offering anything and everything for them to taste and try. Of course, if yours has never tried other foods then this will be different. I think the method for offering the foods is going to come into play for you- bowls, skewers, shallow dishes, etc. Some birds only get to trying new foods when fed in a different way. Of course, you could just get lucky and have a voracious eater who will try anything! Go ahead and just try- there really isn't a best way since every parrot is an individual.




Trinnity wrote:I'd like to share this, which I found doing research:

While Indian Ring Neck Parrots enjoy a great variety of foods and treats, some foods are harmful or even poisonous to them. Among fruits and vegetables, avoid giving your parrot avocado, raw cabbage and onions, eggplant, persimmons, apple seeds, mushrooms, any green parts of tomatoes or potatoes and rhubarb leaves. They may have difficulty digesting milk products, so avoid those. And never give your parrot alcoholic beverages, chocolate and anything containing caffeine.

http://pets.thenest.com/treats-indian-r ... 10321.html


You should be commended for doing research. Diet is a fun and often contradictory topic (as I'm sure you've found since almost every other site says to feed cabbage) to explore when it comes to parrots and the internet!

You will probably find it interesting, then, as to why these foods made this one person's list.

The Brassica family (which includes cabbage, kale, collards, broccoli, radishes, turnips, brussels sprouts, rapeseed, and rutabagas), if eaten in excess and without proper iodine intake, can be goiterogenic. This means that it can suppress thyroid function. So really, if cabbage is toxic, so would be kale, collards, broccoli, radishes, turnips, brussels sprouts, rapeseed, and rutabagas. Since I do not feed excess amounts of cabbage, etc. nor is his diet lacking in iodine, I choose to feed these foods.

Persimmon is a tricky one, since it isn't actually bad, but how it is served is very important. Most people I know have never seen let alone eaten a persimmon since they are difficult to ship (when fully ripe they are extremely soft). This is a fruit you would want to skin, and serve extremely ripe. Making sure it is completely ripe (and removing the skin) reduces the tannin levels that can lead to the creation of bezoars. Phytobezoars are a type of intestinal obstruction and can be caused by eating a large number of high fiber foods like oranges, berries, green beans, figs, apples, etc. So yes, it might cause digestive issues if fed incorrectly.

Eggplant? Of course the plant itself is toxic to us and is a member of the nightshade family (like tomatoes and peppers). But the fruit itself is safe (like tomatoes and peppers).

Avocado has been shown in a few studies to be harmful when fed to cockatiels.

Onions: I'm not going to be picky about onions or garlic. If my bird nibbles a little bit of my food which might contain these, then fine, since he is eating so little. In dogs, cats, and cattle it can possibly cause red-blood cell rupture (causing anemia) and irritation in the digestive tract and possibly ulcers when eaten chronically or in a single, very large amount. We don't have any definite information on these and avians so we (the avian community) are playing "safer than sorry" and not offering it as part of a meal.

I talked about mushrooms in this post here: viewtopic.php?f=3&t=8078&p=96126&hilit=mushrooms#p96126

As for the green parts of tomatoes and potatoes, they can contain solanine and/or nicotine (also in the green parts of tomatillo, eggplant, tobacco, and pepper plants) which are poisonous.

If you want to read some more about rhubarb (my favourite pie is strawberry-rhubarb), I wrote some in a post with some more information linked: viewtopic.php?f=3&t=8078&p=66211&hilit=rhubarb#p66211

I hope this helped feed your need for information and that you will continue to do research!

Edit: Oh yeah! Dairy! Fun topic, here's a little snippet about dairy. viewtopic.php?f=3&t=8078&p=107451&hilit=lactose#p107451
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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too

Postby sajaldhiman » Wed Sep 09, 2015 9:03 am

I am from India and have a question about the diet of my IRN.

I recently brought my IRN, Tito, home. He is about 6-8 months old. The person, who was previously keeping Tito, used to treat Tito very badly and he used to give him only fresh corn to eat. Initially Tito was scared of any human presence around him, but now in 2-3 days, he has become comfortable if we talk to him or keep food for him. Now, because of providing only one food, Tito is not accepting any other food in his diet. I tried many fruits, vegetables (read from this forum). He does not eat any of the fruit/vegetable even he is hungry.

Please suggest me how to introduce new fruits/vegetables/grains in his diet.

Also, I would like to know if it is fine to keep water bowl at the ground level in his cage or it should be kept at elevated level.

Please help!

- Tito's friend.

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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too

Postby Wessel Gordon » Wed Sep 09, 2015 9:15 am

Sajad

Try eating some of the fruits and vegetables in front of him/her and make a show of how delicious they are. Parrots are incredibly curious by nature and the odds are that Tito will want to eat what you're enjoying so much.

I always keep my birds water bowls elevated and secured to the side of the cage to prevent them from accidently spilling it over or them throwing it out to entertain themselves.

Wessel

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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too

Postby sajaldhiman » Wed Sep 09, 2015 9:22 am

Thank you, Wessel.

Sajal

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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too

Postby Wessel Gordon » Wed Sep 09, 2015 10:22 am

No problem.

My apologies for spelling your name incorrectly.

Wessel

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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too

Postby crazybirdlady9871 » Mon Oct 12, 2015 2:39 am

Hey guys! I have just rescued a beautiful male IRN. I was wondering, is it safe to chop up some fruit/veg, then freeze it? and thaw to feed? Only asking as I always see awesome bulk deals :)

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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too

Postby Melika » Wed Oct 14, 2015 6:22 pm

crazybirdlady9871 wrote:Hey guys! I have just rescued a beautiful male IRN. I was wondering, is it safe to chop up some fruit/veg, then freeze it? and thaw to feed? Only asking as I always see awesome bulk deals :)


YES!
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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too

Postby Melika » Sat Oct 17, 2015 11:35 pm

Updated all links (removed or fixed broken links). Added more links, especially in the Nutrition category.

Enjoy. :)
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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too

Postby BeckysBabies » Wed Jan 06, 2016 2:11 pm

Hi all I was wondering about a few things, and maybe y`all can help me out.

Oats....Cooked, or not cooked?
Kiwis.... Peel on or off?
Oranges? Peeling, yes or no?

Thank you in advance

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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too

Postby Melika » Sat Jan 09, 2016 6:18 pm

BeckysBabies wrote:Hi all I was wondering about a few things, and maybe y`all can help me out.

Oats....Cooked, or not cooked?
Kiwis.... Peel on or off?
Oranges? Peeling, yes or no?

Thank you in advance


Oats- either way but they seem to prefer cooked.
Kiwis- either way
Oranges- either way

You may find you have to train your IRN at first before he will peel fruit on his own. Do this by first offering slices, getting him to know what it is and liking it. Then you can just peel a portion, peeling less and less until he is willing to tear it apart on his own. :)
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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too

Postby HorseCrazyAshay » Sun Feb 07, 2016 12:12 am

Oh wow... This is probably one of the most helpful posts I've read on this site :) I just made the Sweet Potato mash recipe- will post when I serve the cubes! I'm also very glad to hear that they don't need pellets... There was a bit of doubt about that before :D

I have a question, though- is it alright to feed them kefir? It's something like yogurt, only with much more health benefits and pro-biotics.

Thanks!

Ashay

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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too

Postby sanjays mummi » Sun Feb 07, 2016 7:48 am

I don't know, but going to the original list, All garlic is a no no!, and parsley is toxic too.

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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too

Postby Mephistopheles » Sun Feb 07, 2016 9:05 am

Hello, I don't know if anyone has asked this already but how would you prepare okra and brussel sprouts for IRNs? Cooked or raw? I'm thinking about testing out some different veggies to see if my guy and gal take to them.

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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too

Postby sanjays mummi » Sun Feb 07, 2016 10:10 am

I feed them raw, but Sanjay isn't keen on Okra.

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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too

Postby Melika » Mon Feb 15, 2016 5:12 pm

sanjays mummi wrote:I don't know, but going to the original list, All garlic is a no no!, and parsley is toxic too.


I had never heard this before so I looked it up to see where it came from. This is very old information based on myth that was common for years (similar to "all parrots need grit" which we now know is completely false). Both garlic and parsley are healthy additions to a FID's diet. In the original post this link is included to healthy herbs and spices: http://eclectusparrots.net/herbs.html As I have said before, those who say garlic is toxic are referencing toxicities for dogs, cats, and cattle. I have been doing more research and have not yet found any evidence that this applies to avians. If you want to be cautious and not feed, that's okay too.


Edit: I went ahead and added a new section to the lists for herbs and spices. The information has always been in the original post, but in link form instead of a list. Making the list should help those looking for such information in the future. Those links in that post aren't just references- they're a wealth of more information. :)

HorseCrazyAshay wrote:Oh wow... This is probably one of the most helpful posts I've read on this site :) I just made the Sweet Potato mash recipe- will post when I serve the cubes! I'm also very glad to hear that they don't need pellets... There was a bit of doubt about that before :D

I have a question, though- is it alright to feed them kefir? It's something like yogurt, only with much more health benefits and pro-biotics.

Thanks!

Ashay


Thank you for using this information! I hope the cubes are accepted well. What kind of kefir? If it's non-dairy kefir, sure. Moderation though, as there is some question that too many probiotics might unbalance the parrot's system.

Mephistopheles wrote:Hello, I don't know if anyone has asked this already but how would you prepare okra and brussel sprouts for IRNs? Cooked or raw? I'm thinking about testing out some different veggies to see if my guy and gal take to them.


I would cook them- but that's because I know Hane wouldn't eat them raw! Try both and see which they prefer (I find this applies to pretty much every vegetable). :)
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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too!)

Postby Mamalousignont » Tue Mar 22, 2016 9:24 pm

I was curious about pecans? Also I have a bag of cracked organic feenek? It says its a dry roasted green wheat its a hot cereal type of thing? Another question sry I was looking for recipes for treats that will harden that I can hang in my pickles cage? He is a 6 month old irn

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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too!)

Postby Melika » Sun Apr 03, 2016 3:15 pm

Mamalousignont wrote:I was curious about pecans? Also I have a bag of cracked organic feenek? It says its a dry roasted green wheat its a hot cereal type of thing? Another question sry I was looking for recipes for treats that will harden that I can hang in my pickles cage? He is a 6 month old irn


Pecans are fine. They will fall into the category with the rest of the nuts.

Freekeh is fine, depending what you put into it (spices, salt, sugar, etc.).


The only recipes I know of for making hard treats involve using sugar, such as honey (like the treats they sell in stores). Keep in mind these are for TREATS. Here is one example of the basic recipe: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cuHeeC1RRTc


Keep in mind that all three are grains/seeds. Your IRN will need a lot of veggetables and fruits in his/her diet to be healthiest!

Enjoy!
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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too!)

Postby Mephistopheles » Mon Nov 28, 2016 5:33 pm

I was having a look though the list again and I was wondering if anyone could recommend ways on serving artichoke and radish? My babies are quite picky so I'm trying to work out more ways to serve their food.

Also, how often can I give my IRNs fennel? They enjoy a nibble every so often but I've been told I shouldn't give too much?

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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too!)

Postby Melika » Mon Dec 26, 2016 8:32 pm

Mephistopheles wrote:I was having a look though the list again and I was wondering if anyone could recommend ways on serving artichoke and radish? My babies are quite picky so I'm trying to work out more ways to serve their food.

Also, how often can I give my IRNs fennel? They enjoy a nibble every so often but I've been told I shouldn't give too much?


They would likely enjoy artichoke just like we do- warm and soft. In my experience, parrots really enjoy the warm, soft foods. Sometimes it is a great way to introduce new flavours.

For Radish you might try slicing or dicing different sizes or using a skewer. Hane loved certain foods on a skewer but others he preferred cut in different ways. For example, he loved carrots if they were sliced into short sticks so he could hold and nibble- but he would never touch a carrot on a skewer. He preferred leafy greens on a skewer and wouldn't really touch them otherwise. Cucumber he preferred in long slices that he could get to the soft seeds easily but would also eat diced. He loved bell peppers diced or in sticks. Hane's brother, Tsume, would only eat veggies that were finely diced.

Much of what we think we know about avian nutrition starts with what we know happens with humans or other animals. With the herbs, we tend to be cautious since too much can cause diarrhea and a bit of upset to the system (though in people some herbs are known to have more serious side effects in large doses). This is also why we tend to use these foods as flavourings even as people rather than just eating a fistful of, say, basil or parsley. They have a high nutritional content even in small doses. A nibble wouldn't be harmful. Eating it as a large part of the meal? ... we don't know. Herbs are often also used in human medicine, but those higher doses would be taken short-term and limited.
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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too!)

Postby sanjays mummi » Tue Dec 27, 2016 10:45 am

Whilst I would Never offer Sanjay garlic or any allium, we gave our dogs garlic and our cats had garlic sausage , because fleas and lice, and ticks are repelled by it, they all lived to a very great age, our German Shepherds, a breed that rarely reaches double figures, were 15 to 16 years when they died. However, keep in mind, garlic thins the blood and shouldn't be eaten to excess.

garrymethews
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Joined: Mon May 22, 2017 3:51 am
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Re: What to Feed your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too!)

Postby garrymethews » Mon May 22, 2017 3:54 am

These are the really very common food, by which we can feed our birds. Thanks for sharing this information with us.

Valda
Posts: 7
Joined: Thu Jan 26, 2017 6:48 am

Re: What to Feed Your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too!)

Postby Valda » Mon Feb 12, 2018 11:06 pm

My ringneck opens up the pip of the mango and eats the centre part. Is this healthy or is it toxic like peach pips etc,

sanjays mummi
Posts: 2041
Joined: Fri Apr 27, 2012 12:07 pm
Location: Bedfordshire UK

Re: What to Feed Your Parrot (recipes, toxicities, links too!)

Postby sanjays mummi » Wed Feb 14, 2018 5:28 pm

I personally wouldn't allow it, better safe than sorry.


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