What sex is my baby cinnamon turquoise ring neck?

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Greenbirdredbeak
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What sex is my baby cinnamon turquoise ring neck?

Postby Greenbirdredbeak » Fri Mar 03, 2017 9:46 pm

I have a four week old Indian ringneck, and would like to know the probability of the sex. The baby is cinnamon turquoise, the mother is blue I think and the father is turquoise… I might have these reversed but I'm not sure… I read that cinnamon is a sex linked genes but I'm not sure what that means. The baby has three siblings and they're all turquoise, one has more blue than the others.

I would really appreciate your thoughts

Greenbirdredbeak
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Mar 03, 2017 9:41 pm

Re: What sex is my baby cinnamon turquoise ring neck?

Postby Greenbirdredbeak » Sat Mar 04, 2017 8:48 am

My baby is on the left!
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rick_s0910
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Re: What sex is my baby cinnamon turquoise ring neck?

Postby rick_s0910 » Sat Mar 18, 2017 6:28 pm

If both parents are normal colored Blue and Turquoiseblue then your baby is a female.
Only the dad can be split to Cinnamon. Split means he carries the gene but you can't see it. It's little confusing, but bare with me. In birds, males have 2X chromosomes (XX) and females have 1X and 1Y chromosome (XY). The locus of a sex-linked mutation, Cinnamon in this case, is on the X chromosome. Birds, like humans, get 50% of their genetic makeup from mom and 50% from dad. What this means is that if dad is Cinnamon, he would carry it on both chromosomes XX. If he is split, he carries it on 1X chromosome. When he passes that gene his boys will have 1cinnamon gene but since males have 2 X chromosomes, you wouldn't be able to see the cinnamon in their feathers. It would be hidden in his genes (he'd be split to cinammon). In order to have a visual Cinnamon male, mom would also have to be cinnamon. Females only have 1 X chromosome so when they get 1 Cinnamon gene, it is automatically visual in the feathers. Females can not be split to cinammon or any sex-linked mutation.
In more simple terms. Males can carry a sex-linked mutation visually which is exactly what it sounds like, you can see that it's a cinnamon bird. It can also carry the mutation as a split which means it is not visible, but its in his genes. Whenever a male visually carries a sex-linked mutation all his female offspring will have that sex-linked mutation visually. If he is split to a sex-linked mutation, 50% of the females will be normal and 50% will be visual SL. Females can only carry a SL mutation visually. They can NOT be split to it.


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