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Albino IRN pair

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enderunn
Posts: 15
Joined: Sat Jan 11, 2014 7:53 pm

Albino IRN pair

Post by enderunn » Tue Mar 17, 2015 7:07 pm

i have albino pair (red eye). what babies i get? thanks
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MissK
Posts: 3006
Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2012 3:46 pm
Location: Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.

Re: Albino IRN pair

Post by MissK » Wed Mar 18, 2015 7:00 am

Hi. Congratulations on your new birds and their shiny new cage. How old are they? Will they be pets? Are they tame? Have you decided how to feed them? Would you like some help designing the inside of their cage? They need a lot more stuff in there.
-MissK

enderunn
Posts: 15
Joined: Sat Jan 11, 2014 7:53 pm

Re: Albino IRN pair

Post by enderunn » Wed Mar 18, 2015 3:37 pm

Hello, They are 4 years old and little tame.Their cage is stainless stell, I've made it.They have 3 eggs. Can you predict the colours of the babies? I feed them boiled egg and chicken, corn, apple, broccoli, potato, parekeet food. Please write your suggestions about the designing of the cage and feeding? Thanks for your message. Have a good day MissK.

MissK
Posts: 3006
Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2012 3:46 pm
Location: Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.

Re: Albino IRN pair

Post by MissK » Wed Mar 18, 2015 10:07 pm

Your birds are pretty. I am not an expert on Ringneck colours, but I believe that Albino is recessive, and thus the birds need to have all Albino genes for them to display that mutation. I don't think they can make any other colour if both birds are Albino. I hope someone who is more informed about mutations will confirm or refute my statement for you!

Lushen1600 started a thread to help people learn how to use a certain calculator to predict offspring mutations. I think it confirms my idea that you can only expect Albinos, but maybe you should have a look at it. viewtopic.php?f=26&t=15669&hilit=lesson This is the post that makes me feel you can only get Albino babies from your pair:
Hi all, in the next lesson as I have said in a previous lesson our next mating will be a

"Lutino cock"
to a
"Lutino hen"

So by now we already know how to enter these into the calculator, so once entered hit the "Generate" button and your results should be as follows
Image

So from the above result we can see that all male babies will be visual lutino without any splits and all females will also be visual lutino without any splits
You made that cage? Truly, that's quite impressive. It looks great! :D

I always like to give my birds some dark green leaf for their vegetable, for the Vitamin A. We like kale in particular. It's related to cabbage. I think you should consider adding that. Some people like bird pellet food, and it frequently contains a bit of grain, like your corn, which seems good, and it's popular for the supplemental nutrition it contains. Other people don't like pellets. I like to offer my birds some human food made of crushed grains. I'm glad you give some meat/egg. I guess your potato is the orange kind? I think your birds are eating OK, pretty much. I don't think there is a perfect recipe for their food, and that variety is best.

In your photograph I see only the birds, some water, and few perches made of the plain wooden dowel stick. The very first thing I would add is perches of different diameters so their feet can get more varied exercise. The good health of their feet is very important. If you can discover what trees grow where you are that are safe for these birds, you should find them some clean (without chemicals) branches. In that way they will have a good perch for exercise and some natural wood to chew and remove the bark, which is good and healthy activity for Ringnecks.

They should always have something to chew, such as soft wood or even uncoloured cardboard or paper, twigs, or grasses. They should have some small objects to play with, like bits of wood or plastic, even leather. If your look at this website you can get some ideas of things you can buy, but also things you can find around your house, such as the lid from a bottle or a shoelace. http://www.drsfostersmith.com/bird-supp ... /5059/5648 A toy doesn't have to be large or expensive. The birds just need something to occupy their time and their natural desire to investigate things.

Food can also be a toy, and searching for food or working to get it is very rewarding for Ringnecks. You should not change how you feed your birds until the babies are weaned, but once the babies can look out for themselves you should let them all try working for some of their food. Read about "foraging" for that.

My Ringnecks have some slack rope to climb, perches of different sizes, a swing, paper to chew, lots of small toys to hold and chew, some puzzles to solve, a bowl to bathe in, and a container to put their toys in. One of them really loves his ball and his seashell. The other one likes a plastic toy with bells. They have food in their bowls and also food made into toys. They have each other. I let them out to fly in the room, and they have a large tree branch over their cages to sit on. They love that. I talk to my tame one and give him food from my hand. I think he likes me. :) I have some old photos on this thread: viewtopic.php?f=5&t=18437&hilit=photos&start=0

I hope you have fun adding some excitement to your cage. It might be best, though, to wait until the babies are weaned and out of the nest before you change things. Don't want to interfere with them raising the young..
-MissK

Wessel Gordon
Posts: 408
Joined: Wed Jul 13, 2011 12:02 pm
Location: South Africa
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Re: Albino IRN pair

Post by Wessel Gordon » Tue Aug 18, 2015 6:10 am

enderrun,

Those are two beautiful birds.

I agree with everything that MissK has said about entertainment etc.

The only thing I would add is: considering the female is incubating eggs it's best to keep to an established routine with feeding times etc and not to disturb them out of those times. I have a female incubating a clutch of eggs right now and even if I think long and hard I can't recall seeing her more than about twice in the past two weeks although if I'm quiet for a few minutes I can hear her moving around in the nest. My policy is to never disturb them once they start incubating (I'm not even sure how many eggs she's sitting on). Once she's seriously incubating don't be surprised if the male tries to keep you out of ''his territory'' a few times even during routine food changes...it's perfectly normal behavior from what I've experienced.

Wessel

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